Monitoring is now completed for the 2018-19 season at Thevenard Island and Delambre Island.

If you are interested in future opportunities please review the information on the get involved page.

 

 Volunteer and staff group photos

We would like to thank all of our volunteers from weeks 1-4 monitoring on the islands. 

Delambre Island

Delambre staff and volunteers group 1
Delambre staff and volunteers group 1

 

Delambre staff and volunteers group 2
Delambre staff and volunteers group 2

 

Delambre staff and volunteers group 3
Delambre staff and volunteers group 3

 

Thevenard Island

 

Thevenard staff and volunteers group 1
Thevenard staff and volunteers group 1

 

Thevenard staff and volunteers group 2
Thevenard staff and volunteers group 2

 

Thevenard staff and volunteers group 3
Thevenard staff and volunteers group 3

 

Thevenard staff and volunteers group 4
Thevenard staff and volunteers group 4

 

Thevenard staff and volunteers group 5
Thevenard staff and volunteers group 5

 

Graphs of monitoring activity for Thevenard Island:

 

Monitoring activity graph Thevenard Island

 

This graph shows the monitoring activity at Thevenard this year.

“New turtles” are turtles that have not been seen during this program (or other monitoring programs) before – they have no tags when they arrive on the beach.   

“Turtles processed” refers to all of the turtles that come up onto the beach during the patrolling hours.  Processing involves recording their tag numbers and measurements once they are returning to the water. If they are new turtles, tags will be added as well as other measurements taken and recorded.

Number of nests refers to the number of nests that have been confirmed by volunteers and staff watching the turtles’ activity whilst they are up on the beach.  Not all turtles will dig a nest during their visit to the beach, many will dig body pits and if they are not happy with the site they may return to the water and try again on another night or in another spot on the beach later.

From this graph we can see that the turtle activity on Thevenard Island has been increasing during the monitoring period, with significantly more turtles visiting the beach in week three.

 

Total number of turtles and nests at Thevenard

 

This graph shows the total number of turtles recorded at Thevenard this year, and the total number of nests made.  As flatbacks lay around 50 eggs in each nest at the end of week 3 we may have around 3000 eggs on the beach at Thevenard Island so far this year.  Although this sounds like a lot, it is estimated that only around 1 egg in 1000 survives to maturity, so this may only equate to 3 mature turtles in about 20 years’ time!

 

 

Loading...